The South Pole; An Account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the “Fram” 1910-1912. Roald Amundsen, Chater A G.,
The South Pole; An Account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the “Fram” 1910-1912
The South Pole; An Account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the “Fram” 1910-1912

The South Pole; An Account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the “Fram” 1910-1912

New York: Lee Keedick; 1913; First American edition in two volumes [The English Translation of 'Sydpolen'] [6.75x9.25”]; Dark navy blue cloth covers with gilt lettering on front cover and spine, top edge gilt with other edges uncut; Vol. I, [1], xxxv, 392 pp., Vol. II, x, 449 pp., 134 plates with illustrations and photographs, with folding plan of “Fram” sectional, and 22 maps and charts, including three folding and 2 color; Near fine condition with slight darkening of spine, minor bumping and wear of corners, and several minor wrinkles to Vol. II cover. [Rosove 9.B2, Howgego A13]. Item #12927

The expedition originally planned to repeat Nansen's drift through the Arctic Ocean with the ‘Fram’ and likely an attempt to reach the North Pole. On hearing that Cook and Peary both claimed to have reached the North Pole in 1909, Amundsen decides, in secret, to change the expedition for the South Pole. In August 1910, the ‘Fram’ left Christina and arrived at Bay of Whales [named by Shackleton in 1908] in January 1911. This winter camp was 1 degree closer to the pole than Scott’s McMurdo Sound base and offered many other practical and scientific advantages. The Norwegians were skilled in skiing and dog handling, which allowed them to travel to the South Pole in 56 days. At 3:00 pm, on Friday, December 14, 1911, there was a simultaneous cry of "Halt!" as the sledge meters registered their arrival at the South Pole. With the Norwegian flag planted, Amundsen named the polar plateau for King Haakon VII. Amundsen left a tent and note for Scott to find one month later.

Price: $1,800.00

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