Washington's Farewell Address to the People of the United States; Also, The Constitution of the United States with its Amendments | Published for the Washington Benevolent Society [Engraving by Abner Reed]. George Washington.

Washington's Farewell Address to the People of the United States; Also, The Constitution of the United States with its Amendments | Published for the Washington Benevolent Society [Engraving by Abner Reed]

Windsor, VT: Printed and Sold by T. M. Pomroy, 1812. Fair. Edition Unstated. A. Reed [Abner Reed of East Windsor, CT]. 18 mo., [5.5x3.5in]; 71 pp., frontispiece of Washington, signed certificate of membership in the Washington Benevolent Society; Original wooden boards covered with marbled paper, spine backed with sheep and gilt lettering "Washington", all edged trimmed; Boards and paper covering in poor condition with most of marbled paper worn away exposing boards, rear board missing large portion, surprisingly the spine is intact with wear to top and bottom with two small insect holes, little insect wear to interior, binding is tight, text pages are tender with age toning and occasional foxing. Certificate of Membership is #80 and issued to Ebenezer Brown of Norwich by the Washington Benevolent Society at Norwich in the County of Windsor State of Vermont on the 20th of April 1812. It is signed by Elisha Burton, President and Reuben Hatch Secretary.
[Sabin 101644]. Item #13441

George Washington (1732-1799) needs no introduction. His Farewell Address (1796), after serving two terms as the first President, is significant in setting the general policy of the young United States to survive in a world dominated by the great powers of Europe. During the period from end of the revolutionary war in 1783 to the “second revolutionary” war of 1812, the United States internal and external relationships were in flux and evolving. Tension with the European powers were high, and the War of 1812 caused controversy.

In the early 1800's political parties were being formed. The Federalist party organized the Washington Benevolent Societies (WBS) as local grass roots political clubs. The first was established at New York City in 1808 and other sprang up thorough out the Northeast States. The membership was primarily revolutionary war veterans, notable local leaders and Federalist party supporters. It became a membership ritual of issuing a small book of the Farewell Address, and later the Constitution, with a membership certificate inserted.

Ebenezer Brown ( - 1830 d) was a Farmer, Deacon, Lawyer, representative to the Vermont General Assembly and Judge in Windsor County Vermont. In 1812, he was a lawyer vying for appointment as a judge. Membership in the popular WBS would help. Elisha Burton (1760-1849) was a Tanner and saw-miller in Norwich. He was a revolutionary war veteran that, at age 17, became a substitute for his father, Josiah, when he was severely wounded in 1777. Reuben Hatch (1763-1818) was a farmer and owned several businesses and property. He was also a representative to the General Assembly and Councilor for several years.

The missing 13th Amendment to the Constitution was an extension of Article 1, Section 9 of the Constitution limiting titles of nobility or other foreign titles without the consent of Congress. In 1812, this was an important issue and the amendment was passed by Congress and 12 States and needed 13 States to be ratified. There was confusion on the vote by Virginia, the 1812 war consumed attention and the issue faded away. However, the amendment was thought to have been ratified and confusion extended to the 1860’s with the adoption of the 14th Amendment.

Price: $390.00

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