Item #12944 The Art of the Exposition; Personal impressions of the architecture, sculpture, mural decoration, color scheme & other asthetic aspects of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. Eugen Neuhaus.

The Art of the Exposition; Personal impressions of the architecture, sculpture, mural decoration, color scheme & other asthetic aspects of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition

San Francisco: Paul Elder and Company, 1915. Very Good. First Edition, 2nd Printing. [June 1915] [9x6in]; x, 91 pp., Frontispiece and 31 tipped in photos, map of exposition grounds; Tan paper boards with gilt lettering on spine and upper, fore edge uncut; Minimal shelf wear, no foxing, slightly darken spine. Item #12944

Eugen Neuhaus 1879-1963) was painter, teacher, critic, art historian, author, University lecturer and organizer for over 50 years in California. The 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition was set in San Francisco after the devastating 1906 earthquake. The Exposition was a showcase of architecture and art, which Neuhaus was the chair of committee to jury the fine arts of the Exposition and was invited to exhibit some of his work. This is the first of four other books about the Exposition developed from lectures.

The 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition (PPIE) was a significant event for San Francisco, California and the United States. The planning for the exposition began in 1904, two years before the devastating 1906 earthquake and fire destroyed most of the City and caused significant damage to most of the bay area. As part of the rebuilding and recovery efforts for San Francisco, the PPIE world fair opened in February 1915 to enthusiastic crowds. The over 600 acres were beautifully designed and promoted as a community of eleven exhibition “palaces”, 21 foreign pavilions, 48 State buildings and a 65 acre amusement zone. The design of the buildings and grounds was an inspirational mix of Greco Romanesque style with modern architectural, artistic and technological elements. Until closing in December 1915, over 18 million visitors enjoyed the exposition, the City and California. After closing, most of the “temporary” buildings were demolished, except for the Fine Arts Palace, lake and grounds (designed by Bernard Maybeck and still in use in 2021) and a few others relocated. The San Francisco Legion of Honor art museum is a replica of the PPIE French pavilion. The land was intended to be sold off for residential and commercial development, which is now known as the Marina District.

Price: $45.00

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